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Font Creator Pro: How to Design and Export Your Own Fonts


How to Create Your Own Font Using Font Creator




Have you ever wanted to make your own font from scratch? Maybe you have a unique handwriting style that you want to digitize, or maybe you have a creative idea for a new typeface that you can't find anywhere else. Whatever your motivation, creating your own font can be a fun and rewarding project that allows you to express your personality and style.




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But how do you go about making a font? You could use a simple online tool that converts your handwriting into a font, but that would limit your options and control over the final result. You could also use a professional font editor like FontLab or Glyphs, but that would require a steep learning curve and a hefty price tag.


Fortunately, there is a third option that combines the best of both worlds: Font Creator. Font Creator is a font editor for Windows that lets you create and edit TrueType, OpenType, Web, and color fonts with ease. It has a user-friendly interface that is suitable for beginners as well as professionals. It has powerful drawing tools that allow you to create smooth and consistent outlines for your letters. It has advanced features that enable you to add OpenType layout features like ligatures, swashes, stylistic sets, etc. It also has a validation and proofing tool that helps you fix common errors and improve the quality of your fonts.


In this article, I will show you how to create your own font using Font Creator, from sketching your letters to exporting your font file. I will also give you some tips and resources to help you along the way. By the end of this article, you will have a custom font that you can use for personal or commercial projects. Ready? Let's begin!


Step 1: Sketch your letters




The first step in creating your own font is to sketch out the letters by hand or in another program. This will give you an idea of how your font will look like and what style and mood you want to convey. You can use paper and pencil, or any drawing software like Photoshop, Illustrator, or Inkscape. You can also use existing fonts as inspiration or reference.


When sketching your letters, keep in mind some basic principles of typography, such as contrast, proportion, alignment, balance, harmony, etc. You don't have to follow any strict rules or conventions, but you should aim for consistency and readability. You should also consider the intended use of your font: is it for headlines or body text? Is it for print or web? Is it for formal or casual contexts? These factors will affect the size, weight, spacing, and style of your letters.


Once you have sketched out all the letters you need for your font (usually at least 26 uppercase and lowercase letters, 10 digits, and some punctuation marks), you can import them into Font Creator. To do this, scan or save your sketches as images (preferably in grayscale) and open them in Font Creator. You can either drag and drop them into the glyph overview window or use the Import Image option from the Tools menu.


Step 2: Vectorize your lettersStep 2: Vectorize your letters




The next step is to vectorize your letters, which means to convert them from bitmap images to vector outlines. Vector outlines are made of curves and lines that can be scaled and edited without losing quality. Font Creator has a built-in tool called the Outline Generator that can automatically vectorize your letters for you. To use it, select the letter you want to vectorize in the glyph overview window and click on the Outline Generator button in the toolbar. You can adjust the settings of the Outline Generator to get the best results for your letter. For example, you can change the smoothness, accuracy, and corner detection of the outlines.


Alternatively, you can also use the drawing tools in Font Creator to manually draw or edit your outlines. You can use the pen tool, the curve tool, the line tool, or the freehand tool to create or modify curves and lines. You can also use the node tool, the knife tool, the scissors tool, or the eraser tool to manipulate or delete nodes and segments. You can access these tools from the toolbar or from the Tools menu.


When vectorizing your letters, you should aim for smooth and consistent outlines that match your sketches and style. You should also avoid unnecessary nodes and segments that can make your outlines complex and messy. You should also check for errors and overlaps in your outlines using the validation tool or the contour overview window. You can fix these errors using the simplify contours option or the remove overlap option from the Tools menu.


Step 3: Edit your letters




After vectorizing your letters, you can edit them further to improve their appearance, spacing, and mapping. You can use the glyph overview window and the glyph edit window to perform these tasks.


The glyph overview window shows all the glyphs in your font in a grid view. You can select, copy, paste, delete, rename, or reorder glyphs using this window. You can also change the font properties, such as the font name, family name, style name, version number, etc., using the Font Properties option from the Format menu.


The glyph edit window shows a single glyph in detail. You can zoom in or out, pan, rotate, or flip the glyph using this window. You can also change the metrics of the glyph, such as the advance width, left side bearing, right side bearing, etc., using the Metrics option from the Format menu. The metrics determine how much space is allocated for each glyph and how they are aligned with each other.


You can also change the mapping of the glyph, which means how it is assigned to a character code or a Unicode value. The mapping determines how your font is accessed by keyboards and applications. You can change the mapping of a glyph using the Mapping option from the Format menu. You can also use the Unicode option from the Tools menu to assign Unicode values to your glyphs based on their names or categories.


When editing your letters, you should aim for clarity and consistency in your font. You should also test your font using the preview panel or the test font option from the File menu. You can type any text using your font and see how it looks like in different sizes and styles. Step 4: Add OpenType features




The next step is to add OpenType features to your font, which are optional enhancements that can make your font more expressive and versatile. OpenType features can include things like ligatures, swashes, stylistic sets, alternates, fractions, small caps, etc. These features can be accessed by users through applications that support OpenType, such as Microsoft Word, Adobe Photoshop, or InDesign.


Font Creator has a tool called the OpenType Designer that allows you to create and edit OpenType features for your font. To use it, select the OpenType Designer option from the Tools menu. You will see a window that shows all the available features for your font. You can add, delete, rename, or reorder features using this window. You can also edit the properties and parameters of each feature using the tabs below.


For example, if you want to add a ligature feature to your font, you can select the Ligatures tab and click on the Add button. You will see a dialog box that lets you choose the glyphs that form the ligature and the glyph that replaces them. You can also specify the script and language that the ligature applies to. You can repeat this process for any other ligatures you want to add to your font.


When adding OpenType features to your font, you should consider the style and purpose of your font. You should also test your features using the proofing tool or the test font option from the File menu. You can select any feature and see how it affects your text in different scripts and languages.


Step 5: Export your font




The final step is to export your font as a font file that you can install and use on your computer or share with others. Font Creator supports various font formats, such as OTF (OpenType Font), TTF (TrueType Font), WOFF (Web Open Font Format), and SVG (Scalable Vector Graphics). Each format has its own advantages and disadvantages in terms of compatibility, quality, and size.


To export your font, select the Export Font As option from the File menu. You will see a dialog box that lets you choose the format and location of your font file. You can also change the name and style of your font file using the Rename Font option from the Format menu. You can also optimize your font file using the Optimize Font option from the Tools menu. This will reduce the size and improve the performance of your font file.


Before exporting your font, you should preview it using the preview panel or the test font option from the File menu. You can also validate your font using the validation tool or the Font Validation option from the Tools menu. This will check for any errors or warnings in your font and suggest ways to fix them.


After exporting your font, you can install it on your computer using the Install Font option from the File menu. You can also share it with others using email, social media, or online platforms like Dafont or Font Squirrel.


Conclusion




Congratulations! You have just created your own custom font using Font Creator. You have learned how to sketch, vectorize, edit, and export your letters using Font Creator's tools and features. You have also learned some basic principles and tips of typography and font design.


Creating your own font is a creative and rewarding process that allows you to express yourself and make something unique. You can use your font for personal or commercial projects, such as logos, posters, invitations, websites, etc. You can also improve your font by adding more glyphs, features, or styles.


If you want to learn more about Font Creator and how to use it effectively, you can check out these links:


  • Font Creator User Manual: A comprehensive guide to all the functions and options of Font Creator



  • Font Creator Tutorials: A collection of video tutorials that show you how to create different types of fonts using Font Creator



  • Font Creator Forum: A community of Font Creator users where you can ask questions, share feedback, or showcase your fonts



FAQs




What is Font Creator?




Font Creator is a font editor for Windows that lets you create and edit TrueType, OpenType, Web, and color fonts with ease.


How much does Font Creator cost?




Font Creator has three editions: Home ($79), Standard ($149), and Professional ($199). Each edition has different features and limitations. You can compare them herehere. You can also download a free trial version of Font Creator from here.


How do I get a registration code for Font Creator?




To get a registration code for Font Creator, you need to purchase a license from the official website. After you complete your payment, you will receive an email with your registration code and instructions on how to activate your license. You can also retrieve your registration code from the Customer Area if you lose it.


What are the system requirements for Font Creator?




Font Creator works on Windows 10, 8, 7, Vista, and XP. It requires at least 512 MB of RAM and 25 MB of hard disk space. It also requires a monitor with at least 1024 x 768 resolution and 16-bit color depth.


How do I contact Font Creator support?




If you have any questions or issues with Font Creator, you can contact the support team by email at support@high-logic.com or by phone at +31 30 692 06 91. You can also visit the Support Center for FAQs, manuals, tutorials, and forums. dcd2dc6462


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